Thursday, December 21, 2006

Google PageRank question

One of my clients, Powwownow, have recently launched their new designs for all their websites (UK, Germany, French and Dutch versions). Now the sites they had previously had received very good Google PageRank throughout. The UK website had a PageRank of 7, the German and French versions had a PageRank of 6.

We incorporated a 301-redirect when launching their new sites, which brought with it most of the "google juice". Unfortuantely some of their pages were brand new and didn't exsist in on the previous site. These pages currently have a Google PageRank of 0/10. Their sites is content managed and all pages have doc ids, some of the doc ids were transferred from the old site but some of them have new doc IDs, these pages also have a PageRank of 0/10 now. The client is understandably worried that this will affect their rankings. And they think it will take a long time before their new pages will receive the same PageRank as the old site. I personally don't think it will affect their rankings and consequently site traffic alot, the homepage still has a PageRank of 7/10. What do you think?

I would love to have some opinions about this, has anyone had any experience similar? How often is it believe that Google updates the PageRank?

Also, has anyone experienced that the Google toolbar gives different Google PageRank result depending on when you downloaded the toolbar? When i check PageRank on my home computer it gives a totally different result than on my computer at work? Has this something to do with the different data centers?

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5 Comments:

At December 21, 2006 7:28 pm, Blogger softplus said...

Hi Lisa
The last toolbar pagerank update used data from around June. You can check the last updates at http://www.seocompany.ca/pagerank/page-rank-update-list.html (Bob Mutch). Google internally uses a different, live kind of PR. If it shows 0/10, it is likely something else "in real life" :-). You can check pagerank per datacenter at http://oy-oy.eu/google/pr/ (there's no need to check within the same C-Class of IP-addresses). You can calculate the relative pagerank a page should have if you know +/- where the links point to (within the site) and have the site-structure (simple example: http://www.webworkshop.net/pagerank_calculator.php or http://www.seocompany.ca/pagerank/page-rank-explained.html ) , but it's likely not worth it. Pagerank is also interpolated (guessed at) when Google assumes it knows the linking structure. In general, that means a guess of a 1PR drop per folder level -- just because a new page displays a PR value does not mean it really has a toolbar-PR value, it might just be a guess (and you can't tell which values are guesses and which ones are real)

Tip: Don't waste too much of your time chasing the green dots. With a crawlable site, a fairly standard internal linking structure and a strong site in general, the real PR will most likely be OK, the displayed value will come "whenever". Unless a site is a directory selling links based on PR, nobody is really going to care which number is displayed (other than the SEO and the uninformed site owner).

 
At December 21, 2006 11:13 pm, Blogger Lisa Ditlefsen said...

This comment has been removed by the author.

 
At December 21, 2006 11:14 pm, Blogger Lisa Ditlefsen said...

thanks so much for your comments "softplus", that's really useful =)

Really appreciate the links and comments on this as I'm havin a bit of a hard time explaining to the client that PageRank is not everything!

Cheers,

 
At December 22, 2006 1:34 am, Blogger Halfdeck said...

Softplus summed it up pretty well.

Internal PageRank is updated daily, so if a new page is in Google's main index, it's a pretty good sign that the PageRank of that page isn't 0, even if the tool bar reads zilch. Anyway, I see no reason to worry about PageRank as long as the site keeps acquiring new IBLs.

 
At December 22, 2006 6:13 am, Blogger Punit said...

I don't feel PR is a big deal now, when G will update the PR all the pages will get fair PR. What really matter is content, SEO friendly website structure, quality and relevant link to the website. If the pages are fairly new it will take some time to get properly updated on all the Google datacenters. Once the process is over it will start appearing in SERPS without any problems. My 2’c

 

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